Monthly Archives: October 2018

Managing Spare Parts in Manufacturing Settings

When it comes to maintaining an inventory of spare parts on hand many companies are reluctant.   There are quite a few in management that wonder if it is counter intuitive while trying to control operating costs.  The goal of all businesses, not just manufacturing, is to reduce expenses while increasing efficiency and many don’t see how keeping spare electrical components on hand helps achieve this goal.  In this installment we will look into how having an inventory of parts on hand eliminates downtime and increases overall effectiveness without extra expense to the company.

Inventory Management

By incorporating spare part management into plant operations managers can successfully create an environment where downtime, caused by machine failure, is practically eliminated.  The biggest struggle in spare part management is creating an inventory.  In order to do this effectively, it is crucial that the maintenance records of machinery are thoroughly gone over, and critical part breakdowns are identified.  Once this has been completed there you will be left with an idea of what spare parts are needed to comprise a complete operational spare part inventory.

Don’t forget when creating an inventory list to check into refurbished parts and components.  Many older pieces of equipment have become obsolete however this doesn’t mean that you can’t find parts to repair them.  Many times, obsolete equipment can be repaired using parts that can be found through companies specializing in obsolete refurbished electrical components, such as J & P Electrical Company, https://www.jpelectricalcompany.com.

Strategy of Operations

Determining whether you will function as a predictive or reactive position plays a large role in the replacement part stock that you will keep on hand.  Most manufacturers are historically known for being reactive to events like equipment failure.  In order to successfully create a functional spare part inventory, facilities must turn their focus on a more predictive approach to machine maintenance and failure. Successful predictive spare part management will include the collection and analysis of data, the ability for managers to see the operation as hole in which they foresee underlying problems and find solutions.

Inventory Control

Don’t think that your spare part inventory has to be all-encompassing to be effective. In reality that is an unrealistic goal to achieve.  Instead develop an inventory that is categorized by priority.  Recognize parts that can be used for more than one purpose, those that are critical to your operation, and those critical to a specific piece of machinery.  This needs to be revaluated on a regular basis to make sure that as new machinery is introduced they aren’t forgotten.

J & P Electrical Company is a full-service electrical company that supplies contractors, end users, and supply houses with new surplus, quality reconditioned, and obsolete electrical equipment. We purchase a wide range of electrical equipment such as bus plugs, bud ducts, panel switches, substations, and transformers.  More information can be found at https://www.jpelectricalcompany.com

Eaton launches ADR breaker range guaranteeing protection in harsh environments

Eaton has announced the global launch, at InnoTrans 2018 of ADR, of a new product family from Eaton’s Heinemann Hydraulic Magnetic Circuit Breakers (HMCB) range.

Designed in Switzerland, ADR fills an important void in the company’s HMCB offer, which Eaton signals as a key breakthrough for the market.

The circuit breaker guarantees electrical protection of equipment in use in harsh environments, such as railways, without derating the tripping point in the event of temperature variations.

Critically, the breaker is compatible with a standard 17.5mm Miniature Circuit Breaker for mounting on a DIN 35mm rail. This means railways and train operating companies can benefit from HMCB’s improved performance without having to redesign electrical equipment cabinets or change panels and connecting interfaces, improving the viability of potentially valuable retrofit and upgrade projects.

HMCB offers numerous advantages over conventional Thermo-Magnetic Circuit Breaker (TMCB) technology.

  • For example, nuisance tripping from high ambient temperatures is eliminated as HMCB only responds to current variations, not changes in temperature. Changes in oil viscosity following increases in temperature onboard trains decrease trip response times, protecting equipment that might be vulnerable at higher ambient temperatures.
  • HMCB can also eliminate transient current surges, another cause of nuisance tripping, with a high degree of precision and without reducing overload protection. In addition, Hydraulic-magnetic control of the tripping mechanism means that the time delay is inversely proportional to the size of the overload, speeding up the response to large overloads and short circuits where the potential danger is higher.
  • While clearly a logical step for rolling stock operators and train manufacturers, until now replacing DIN mounted TMCB with HMCB has been far from straightforward. The HMCB connector is different and the size of the device is usually bigger than the standard TMCB.

“Eaton has achieved a major breakthrough with ADR,” says Alexandre Zint, Heinemann product manager at Eaton.

“The new technology is designed to be compatible with existing cabinets, which currently support thermal circuit breakers, enabling users to benefit from the improved performance traditionally associated with HMCB devices but without major modifications to rolling stock. Installing this technology can also significantly reduce the weight of these components and fulfils Eaton’s objective to build better and safer trains.”

Already some train and industrial machine manufacturers are evaluating how they can integrate ADR, and Eaton is confident the technology will deliver superior performance.

“ADR opens the door to new customers who were reluctant to change their integration design to upgrade their circuit breaker technology,” Zint continues. “It is also suitable for manufacturers looking to reduce the space occupied in their electrical cabinets. ADR is 17.5mm wide compared with 19mm in a standard HMCB, meaning that for every 12 HMCB installed, you could install 13 ADR”.

“We look forward to meeting both old and new customers at InnoTrans to discuss how they might benefit from ADR, and our other electrical and hydraulic technology solutions,” Zint concludes.

Download the white paper to learn more about the new HMCB range.

Eaton at InnoTrans 2018

At this year’s InnoTrans (at Messe Berlin from September 18-21), Eaton will demonstrate its latest electrical and hydraulic technology solutions, which are enabling rail operators and rolling stock OEMs to build better and safer trains and helping to secure a sustainable future. Find out more by visiting us in Hall 9, stand 301.


What to Avoid When Purchasing Refurbished Electrical Components

Buying refurbished electrical components such as circuit breakers, transformers, bus ducts and plugs is just one way that industrial manufacturers can save a great deal of money.  The one aspect that needs to be seriously considered is where companies purchase refurbished electrical components.  Buying from reputable refurbished manufacturers is a must when it comes to electrical components that will be used in any settings, especially the manufacturing industry.  Some companies, often less reputable offer deep discounts.  It is crucial to ensure that the savings don’t equate to an increased safety risk.

When purchasing refurbished electrical components, especially from online companies like ebay take note to thoroughly check over equipment for damage, rust, missing pieces, or improper labeling. When buying online it is important to know exactly what you are looking for before you make a purchase.  This can help to ensure that you are sure to get exactly what you need.  Once you have developed a relationship with an online supplier through ebay or another online source you will have more confidence in purchasing through them in the future.

What to Avoid When Purchasing Refurbished Electrical Components

  • Be sure you know what you are looking to purchase. Purchasing electrical components is different than a lot of other purchases in that you should do some research to really know what you need and are looking for before you even begin researching places to purchase it.  Understand the different brands available and the part number that you are looking for.
  • Advertising and ads are meant to draw people in. Don’t get taken by an ad that doesn’t offer specifics on products that you are interested in purchasing.  You should know in detail what you are purchasing and the exact condition it is in.  Understanding the difference between new, used, and refurbished electrical components helps to make sure you are getting exactly what you expect.
  • If the information you need is not clearly listed on the products label it is important to ask questions about the product and get all answers in writing. This clear communication between seller and buyer will help prevent confusion and later disputes.
  • Never buy from a company that doesn’t have a solid track record. Before purchasing any electrical parts and components, new or used, do research on the company offering it for sale.  Does the company have reviews and testimonials?   How long have has the company been in business?  What is their return policy?  Seek out their policies; find out if there is a restocking fee if a return needs to be done, if they offer returns, or if it is exchange only.

Questions to Ask When Buying Refurbished Parts and Components

  • Am I purchasing a new, used, or refurbished part?
  • If refurbished, what is the process, in detail, that the part goes through before it can be sold?
  • What are the company’s product guarantees and warranties?
  • Am I buying a piece that is in proper working order or is it being sold as is, for parts only?
  • What is the testing process your refurbished parts go through before they are sold?

Purchasing refurbished parts and components makes solid business sense especially in an economy where we are trying to stretch our already tight budgets.   It is important to have properly working and maintained equipment when working in any industrial manufacturing setting.  One was to ensure this occurs is to purchase your refurbished electrical components and parts from companies with a solid reputation, like J & P Electrical Company.

J & P Electrical Company is a full-service electrical company that supplies contractors, end users, and supply houses with new surplus, quality reconditioned, and obsolete electrical equipment. We purchase a wide range of electrical equipment such as bus plugs, bud ducts, panel switches, substations, and transformers.  More information can be found at https://www.jpelectricalcompany.com

Solved! What to Do When Your Circuit Breaker Keeps Tripping

Learn the proper way to figure out why the power keeps pooping out in your house—as well as when to let an electrician do the sleuthing.

Why Does a Circuit Breaker Keep Tripping? Solved!

Photo: istockphoto.com

Q: Every few hours—sometimes minutes!—my living room and one side of my kitchen lose electrical power. Lamps won’t come on; I can’t make toast or watch television. I’ll check the breaker panel and, sure enough, a circuit breaker has tripped…again. I flip it back on and all is well until it happens again! I’m concerned about the wiring in my home. Should I call an electrician, or is there a simple DIY fix I can try first?

A: While it’s frustrating to have to keep switching a tripped breaker back on, keep in mind that a circuit breaker is an important safety mechanism. Designed to shut off the electrical current when something goes wrong, it’s one of the best ways of protecting your home from an electrical fire. You may ultimately have to call an electrician to deal with whatever causes your circuit breaker tripping—electrical current isn’t something to mess with—but a little sleuthing will help you see if it’s something easily remedied.

First, let’s review some basics to help you understand what might be happening. Electricity from your local utility company runs through a cable directly to your breaker panel (service panel). From there, the electricity flows through individual circuits (a circuit is a wiring loop that starts and ends at the breaker panel). Each breaker you see in the panel has an ON/OFF switch and controls a separate electrical circuit in your home. When a breaker trips, its switch automatically flips to the “OFF” position, and it must be manually turned back on in order for electricity to flow through the circuit again.

Why Does a Circuit Breaker Keep Tripping? Solved!

Photo: istockphoto.com

Test for circuit overload. A circuit overloads when more electrical current is being drawn through the wires than they can handle, causing them to overheat and trip the circuit breaker. You mention that when the breaker trips, power goes out in your living room and part of your kitchen. This indicates that a single circuit is powering multiple outlets and switches, which is probably too much of a burden on the circuit. This type of wiring configuration is commonly seen in homes more than 40 years old, before we used a lot of electrical appliances and gadgets (big screen TVs, PCs, space heaters, and powerful kitchen appliances).

To test for circuit overload, the next time the breaker trips, turn off all the switches in the affected area and unplug all appliances, lamps, and other devices. Flip the breaker back on and then turn on the switches and plug in/turn on devices one at a time. Wait a few minutes in between to see if the circuit will remain on. Each time you turn on a light or run an appliance, you’ll be drawing more electricity through the wires. If the breaker trips before you turn on all the appliances, try the experiment again, this time turning on the appliances in a different order. You may need to go through the process several times to get a good idea of how many appliances you can operate at one time before overloading the circuit.

Circuit overload is one of the most common reasons for circuit breakers tripping, and you can prevent it from happening by running fewer appliances at the same time on that circuit. The best long-term solution, however, is to have an electrician update your home’s wiring to add additional circuits. In your situation, having a separate circuit to handle the part of the kitchen that’s now on your living room circuit would allow you to use your kitchen appliances (mixer, bread machine, toaster) without fear of overloading the living room circuit.

Investigate for a short circuit. A “short” circuit means that two wires that should not be coming in contact with each other are inadvertently touching. A short can occur in an outlet, a switch, or within an appliance if wires are loose or damaged by mice or pets chewing through them. When an electrical short occurs, it triggers a sudden surge of electricity through the wires, and the circuit breaker trips.

To find out if an appliance has a short, perform a test similar to the one you did for an overloaded circuit. When you plug in or turn on an appliance that has a short in its wiring, it will immediately trip the circuit—whether or not anything else is running. If you notice that using a specific appliance, such as your vacuum, trips the breaker every time you turn it on, try plugging it into an outlet in a different room. If the breaker for that room trips, there’s a short in the appliance. Don’t use the appliance again until it can be fixed, or you risk getting a shock.

Because a short circuit can also occur in a wall switch or an outlet, if the breaker trips every time you turn on a specific light switch or plug something into a certain outlet, that indicates the location of the short. Electrical shorts in home wiring should be inspected and repaired by a licensed electrician; discontinue use of the switch or plug until the pro takes care of the problem.

Why Does a Circuit Breaker Keep Tripping? Solved!

Photo: istockphoto.com

Call a pro to determine if a ground fault is why your circuit breaker keeps tripping. In the world of wiring, any time an abnormal surge of electricity occurs, it’s known as a “fault” or a “fault current.” In addition, electricity has an interesting way of seeking the path of least resistance to the ground. Benjamin Franklin found that out when he flew a kite in a lightning storm!

A ground fault, also called an “earth fault,” occurs when the electricity running through your home’s wiring diverts from its intended path (the wiring loop) and travels via a different path to the ground. A ground fault can happen if water from a dripping pipe, leaky window, or other moisture source finds its way into an outlet or switch box. Water is a great conductor of electricity, and if it makes contact with wire connections or damaged wires, electricity can jump from the wiring loop and follow the water trail. This creates a surge in electricity and the circuit breaker will trip.

Today’s building codes make provisions for the inclusion of ground wires that carry errant electrical current safely to the earth. The greatest danger from a ground fault occurs when a human becomes the path for electricity that’s trying to find its way to the ground, which can result in electrocution. This used to be a more common occurrence before the invention of ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) outlets, which are now required in kitchens and bathrooms. When a GFCI senses a ground fault, it shuts off the electric current within a fraction of a second.

If a ground fault is the problem, the cause of the errant water must be discovered and repaired, and any damaged wiring must also be replaced. In rooms where water is commonly used, if GFCI outlets are not present, be smart and safe by having them installed.

Have an electrician pinpoint other possible culprits. It’s possible that a breaker in the breaker panel is undersized for the amount of electricity passing through the wiring loop. Or the actual wiring that runs to the outlets might be not up to electrical code, meaning it can’t carry the electricity without heating up and tripping the breaker. These and all other types of home wiring problems—aside from those explained in the sections above—should be inspected and addressed by a licensed electrician. According to the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), each year “thousands of people in the United States are critically injured and electrocuted as a result of electrical fires, accidents, electrocution in their own homes.” If you’re not experienced in home wiring, it’s well worth the $150 to $200 it costs to have an electrician come out and take a look.

Original Source: https://www.bobvila.com/articles/circuit-breaker-tripping/

Original Author: Glenda Taylor